Physical Therapy FIRST

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Set up an appointment to see the doctor, wait a few weeks, see doctor, get referred to physical therapy, wait another few weeks, THEN see a PT.

Wouldn’t it be easier to just get straight in to see your physical therapist?

You can!

Many are unaware that instead of going straight to the doctor for an injury, you can go straight to a physical therapist first.

Not only will you cut out the waiting period, but often, physical therapy is used as a means of conservative treatment before other options are explored. Instead of immediately turning to prescription drugs or invasive surgery for treatment, your physical therapist can trial more conservative modalities, hands on work, and strengthening exercises to help lead you towards health and healing.

Here are just a couple of reasons why physical therapists should be the first step:
• Weight training and bone health with osteoporosis/osteopenia
• Physical therapy during cancer treatment
• Pre-surgical rehabilitation
• Avoiding surgery: Strengthening of supporting muscles may help to avoid going under the knife.

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Is your child’s backpack too heavy?

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Some of the backpacks that kids bring home today seemingly weigh more than the kid themselves. These heavy backpacks can lead to pain and soreness, progressing towards musculoskeletal issues in the future if not addressed.

Some signs that may mean the backpack is too heavy are:

  • Pain between the shoulder blades when wearing the backpack
  • Indentations or red markings on the shoulders
  • Complains of tingling and/or numbness in the hands or arms

Here are a few key components on backpacks to consider, preventing these problems from occurring:

  • Fit: The base of the backpack should rest centered in the middle of the back. Both shoulder straps should always be worn on top of the shoulder as well as under the arms, with the arms having the ability to freely move.
    • Avoid the backpack sagging down to hips/buttocks.
  • Weight: The backpack should not weigh more than 10% of the student’s bodyweight.
    • While it is important to be prepared for classes, being judicious with what is placed in the backpack each day is important.
  • Structure: The ideal backpack would have padded shoulder straps with hip and/or sternum straps to equally distribute weight as well as prevent frequent movement/friction of the backpack.