Dry Needling for Runners

Trigger Point Dry Needling (TDN) is a physical therapy intervention involving a thin filament, similar to an acupuncture needle, that is inserted through the skin targeting and releasing myofascial trigger points in the underlying tissue.

To put it simply, the dry needling increases blood flow and relaxes the muscles, causing the muscle to contract and return to its normal function, stimulating the body’s healing process.

When running, the legs are placed on constant, low-level contraction for a long period of time. This can cause a development of tight tendons and trigger points within the soft tissue.
The use of dry needling releases trigger points, allowing for the tight muscles, tendons, and ligaments to relax, reducing pain and restoring function.

There are several common areas in which runners develop trigger points, including:
• Hip musculature
• Thigh/knee
• Hamstring
• Calf musculature

Cost: Dry needling may be employed as part of an overall maintenance treatment ($20/15minutes) with an additional $10 supply fee.

If you feel you would like to try Dry Needling, schedule a complimentary consult at UBE Physical Therapy and Performance.

4 Exercises to Consider with Shoulder Instability

It is common for your shoulder to feel unstable or loose due to a previous injury where the instability was never fully resolved, and now you are noticing excessive movement in the shoulder with your job or your workouts. It is the job of the rotator cuff to secure the shoulder into the socket so targeting this muscle group is pivotal in improving shoulder stability. The video demonstrates four movements that will help assist you in addressing this issue. You want to work the muscle endurance initially, so aim for a higher rep count and reduce the rep count to address strength once you feel that instability is improved. All exercises should be challenging by the last rep with no pain!

Plank
Weight bearing through the shoulder is a functional way that the rotator cuff is activated. Hold the plank working toward a 2-minute hold and to 2-3 sets. If you need more of a challenge for shoulder stability, try the variations below.

Plank Variation-Shoulder taps
Aim for 15 SLOW taps to each shoulder for 2-3 sets if performed on the floor, and 6-8 taps per shoulder for 2-3 sets if on the wall.

Dips
Start with limited motion aiming for 3 sets of 15

Single Arm Overhead Farmers Carry
Walk for 15-20 yards and back for 3-4 sets

Single Arm Dumbbell Snatch
Start with 3 sets of 12 reps for each shoulder

Again, the aim is to target rotator cuff muscle endurance initially, so start with a weight where you feel fatigued by the last few reps of each set. Once you feel that your stability is improving, move onto phase 2 to work on strengthening. Increase your weight so that you feel fatigued by the last few reps but keep your rep count down to no more than 6-8.